Dental Implants

Dental Implant Presentation

To provide you with a better understanding of dental implants, we have provided the following multimedia presentation. Many common questions pertaining to dental implants are discussed.

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Dental implants are changing the way people live. They are designed to provide a foundation for replacement teeth which look, feel and function like natural teeth. The person who has lost teeth regains the ability to eat virtually anything. Knowing that teeth appear natural and that facial contours will be preserved they can smile with confidence.

What are Dental Implants?

The implants themselves are tiny titanium posts which are inserted into the jawbone where teeth are missing. These metal anchors act as tooth root substitutes. They are surgically placed into the jawbone. The bone becomes intimate with the titanium, creating a strong foundation for artificial teeth. Small posts are then attached to the implant which protrude through the gums. These posts provide stable anchors for artificial replacement teeth, both for single teeth or bridges or for denture retention and stability.

Implants also help preserve facial structure, preventing the bone deterioration that occurs when teeth are missing. Implants will also stop the bone loss that occurs when teeth are lost. Years of wearing dentures will lead to an atrophic jaw. Implants stabilize that bone loss.

Missing Upper Front Tooth

Missing Tooth
Missing Tooth
X-Ray of Implant in Place
X-Ray of Implant in Place
Temporary Tooth in Place (Flipper)
Temporary Tooth in Place (Flipper)
Healing Cap in Place
Healing Cap in Place
Support Post in Place
Support Post in Place
Final Restoration in Place
Final Restoration in Place

The Surgical Procedure

Although the placement of dental implants, for most patients, involves two surgical procedures, the second procedure, to just uncover the implant, is pretty simple. There are times when t hat second procedure is not even needed. Implants are carefully inserted into the bone of your jaw, either upper or lower jaw, with the help of intravenous sedation. This is done in the office setting. For the first three to six months following surgery, the implants are beneath the surface of the gums gradually bonding with the jawbone. It takes longer for implants to become integrated with the bone in the upper jaw. You should be able to wear your modified dentures and eat a normal diet in a short time if you are having implants placed to stabilize a denture. If you are having a single implant placed there is little alteration of your normal function. After initial healing, the vast majority of patients experience no discomfort or complications. Most patients almost forget that the implants are in place and bonding with bone.

After the implant has bonded to the jawbone, Dr. Buche will uncover the implants, usually a simple procedure with local anesthesia. This is unnecessary with a single stage implant. Small posts, or abutments, are then attached. These posts protrude through the gums and your dentist will use them to construct dental crowns or attach supporting structures for new dentures. Depending on the location of the implants, the entire procedure, from start to new dental appliances, may take from three to seven months. We are now beginning to see new procedures that may cut the time down somewhat . Most patients experience minimal disruption in their daily lives.

Sometimes, due to the loss of bone that occurs when teeth have been missing for a long time, there is just not adequate bone to support a dental implant. When that situation is found, bone can be “grafted” into the area so that the implant can be supported. Bone may be ONLAYED when the ridge of bone is too narrow, or it may be placed into the lower aspect of the sinus of the upper jaw. This procedure is called the SINUS LIFT or SINUS AUGMENTATION procedure. Dr. Buche will explain the details concerning this procedure if you require extra bone in the back part of your upper jaw.

HOW CAN DENTAL IMPLANTS BE USED?

1. FOR THE REPLACEMENT OF SINGLE MISSING TEETH

How a Dental Implant Replaces your Missing Tooth

Normal Tooth Replacement Tooth Placed In

If you have lost a single tooth, such as a front tooth, from trauma or from other causes, such as a failed root canal, a single tooth implant can be placed instead of having a conventional bridge, which requires good teeth on ether side of the space to be “cut down” to accept crowns that will support the new tooth. Adequate bone structure must be availble to support the implant – otherwise, a bone graft may be necessary prior to the placement of the implant.

2. FOR REPLACEMENT OF MULTIPLE TEETH.

More Implants are Often Needed to Replace Missing Molar Teeth

2 Missing Lower Molars
2 Missing Lower Molars
3 Implants Replacing 2 Lower Molars
3 Implants Replacing 2 Lower Molars

If you have large spaces where teeth have been lost, implants may be the choice for replacements, rather than the conventional partial dentures. Prior to implants, only removable partial dentures were able to bridge in long spaces where teeth were lost. Now, with implants, you can often eliminate those difficult to wear partials!

3. TO HELP SUPPORT DENTURES

Missing All Lower Teeth (2 Implants)

X-Ray of Both Implants
X-Ray of Both Implants
Implants With Attachments
Implants With Attachments
Bottom of Specialized Denture
Bottom of Specialized Denture
View of Implants With Retentive Anchors
View of Implants With Retentive Anchors
Both Dentures In Place
Both Dentures In Place
Top View of Lower Denture
Top View of Lower Denture

Upper and Lower Implant Supported Dentures

Implant Supported Upper Dentures
Implant Supported Upper Dentures
Implant Supported Lower Dentures
Implant Supported Lower Dentures

Conventional dentures are difficult to wear. The conventional removable denture is l00 year old technology, and things have changed so much for the better! With implants to help stabilize a lower denture, you can expect to eat better, talk with confidence, and smile without fear of having your denture come loose …. or out! There are several ways of supporting a denture. Small ball attachments can be placed that will fit tightly into o-rings placed in your denture or the denture can be fully supported on a bar that fits over multiple implants. This Bar Attachment is absolutely firm, and the denture will not have to touch the gums at all. It is a completely implant-supported denture, and it snaps into place with precision.